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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
up before, how much cooperation from the c.i.a. dod from the whitehouse, a. and did it affect at all the release date? >> well the release date was generated by the production schedule. i only finished the movie i'd say about 10, 12 days ago. >> rose: right. >> so we couldn't have release this movie any earlier than we are releasing it now. >> rose: [indiscernible] >> it helps, it definitely helps but mark was reporting the story and he was the one communicating with various sources. and really kind of getting inside that community in order to tell this story as faithfully as we could. >> rose: what did you know, both of you, but what did you know before may that you were working on? what kind of story were you doing. >> i was completely focused on toraboa. >> rose: really. do you know why he got away from torabora. >> can we make that movie. >> i can show you in the movie. >> rose: can you make that movie now? >> i don't know. >> rose: you worked on it, you got the elements there. >> just like in story how they got them. there's no one piece of the intelligence puzzle. it's a
was involved in the cia he says in the movie that he has done things that are unforgivable and unforgettable. he is trying to get amends -- somehow make amends for that in his life. it is an impossible thing to do. according to the things he did -- he will never be able to make amends. but at least he has to try. thrown into this emotional baggage this character has comes this issue that has to do with forrest whitacker and eva longoria's character. forrest is a head of a peasant movement in south america. years before, i was responsible for putting him in jail for 10 years. he has been labeled an ego terrorist by a country -- company controlling the water rights. tavis: an ecoterrorist. >> there is a big break up. they end up killing a lot of people, quarantining areas, getting rid of the population. he gets wind of this. i am sent down and pulled out to rescue him and bring him back, so the truth comes out by a member of the actual -- the sister of the ceo of the company, who is not playing along. i have to basically go back and re-counter a man i put in jail many years before. he does not
for "the hurt locker," takes us inside the black sites an detention centers and the cia offices where military contractors and intelligence operatives battled to extract the information that would find bin laden. bigelow is so focused on authenticity that the film fungss in an element documentary-like style as she underdramatizes this dramatic story. it's stripped of hollywood schmaltz or over stylization to tell this important narrative in a harrowing way. we watched waterboarding and bloody men dragged across boards in dog collars and it forces to you reconfront your beliefs about torture. i have always been steadfastly against torture as if felt like nothing less than compromising the american soul and giving our enemies in al qaeda a gift they could use to inspire and recruit and pragmatically we know little to know actionable intelligence came to torture. detective work and treating detainees with respect is more effective but as i watch contractors beat our enemies to a pulp, i wondered if i were in their boots during that time of war charged with making radicalized men talk on
out where he was. and a cia team is responsible for that. >> right. >> and then it's the story of how they went in there and killed him. >> yes. >> the first part of the story centers around actress jessica chastain plays a cia person. is that a real person? >> well, again, they're all based on real people. >> right. so there is a real cia agent that she plays who found the link to the courier who took them. >> with her tenacity, her courage and her dedication, you know, really drove that lead forward. and gave it a lot of traction. you know, and i think the interesting thing about the movie is it really puts you in her shoes. it puts you in that intelligence hunt and gives you a glimpse into the intelligence community and the dedication of these men and women including her. but all the men and women that are involved in something -- in an operation that is this complicated and this arduous. >> have you met her, or did mark meet her? >> well, we protect our sources. i'll leave it at that. >> you know, were you surprised that there was a woman who was so intricately involved? because a
's people that think it's loose talk to encourage an intervention in syria. we'll talk to a former cia officer about that and sanjay gupta. plus an activist inside syria and what he has to say about the potential threat, next. oç=Ñp >>> syria's government is under scrutiny tonight as the world awaits the a sad's next move. as we told you last night, nbc news is reporting that syria's actually loading chemical weapons in to bombs. cnn has not confirmed the nbc report. all of this comes amid a string of opposition victories. recently they took control of key oil fields, saw advances in aleppo and reports suggest they surround the capital of damascus. one opposition spokesman told cnn they started what they believe to be the end battle of this war. if the intelligence on the chemical weapons, though, is true, the latest advances by the opposition seem to add incentives to the syrian government to use them. the assad regime denies having chemical weapons, and claims the reports are being used to justify an international invasion. after more than 20 months of fighting and more than 40,
wire is a sports analyst. chad sweet is a former cia director of operations. and ken baer is a white housed a virus. todd carmichael is the host of dangerous grounds. howard kurtz will join us. and economic diane swonk rounds things out for us today. "starting point" begins right now. >>> good morning. welcome, everybody. let's begin with developing news this morning. a tsunami threat to tell you about was just lifted in japan. the country was rocked by a powerful 7.3 magnitude earthquake. it hit off the coast of tokyo. the buildings there shaking. you could see some of the video showing the degree to which they were shaking. alex, what's the latest? >> reporter: it has been a very, very tense few hours here in japan after you mentioned a 7.3 magnitude earthquake striking late here in the day on friday. but just in the past 90 minutes or so, the all clear has been given. the tsunami warning has been lifted. that's great news for the people here. there's no signs of any significant damage. no reports of any deaths. just a few injuries at this point. we also have to keep in mind the nu
with what general david petraeus, the director of the cia, told the committee in the senate where he said they knew immediately after the attack, the next day, that it was, in fact, an attack launched by al qaeda. now, speaking to reporters in ireland on one of her last trips as secretary of state, hillary laughed off questions about a potential presidential run in 2016, saying she's just too busy with her current job to think long term. >> i'm right now too focused on what i'm doing to complete all the work we have ahead of us before i do step down, and i am frankly looking forward to returning to living a life that enjoys a lot of simple pleasures and gives me time for family and friends and other pursuits. >> but as we told you yesterday, the majority of americans are hoping clinton doesn't stay out of politics for too long. the latest abc news/"washington post" poll shows 57% would vote for clinton in a 2016 presidential bid. >>> turning now to news overseas. all eyes are on two tense situations developing by the hour that could have serious implications for the united states. in syri
, she didn't write the information she put forth the c.i.a. did. senator mccain was going after her, some thought there was a personal feud. >> it's hard to imagine but senator mccain should be praising her for doing her job well especially when you have national security crisis, you want most of our officials you want everyone to be on the same page. she was on the same page, so he should be saluting her applauding her and really not providing these kind of horrible statements about her. i've known her for many years and she is a very tough negotiator on behalf of the united states. she represents the united states well, and she is such a brilliant woman. that's what i think senator mccain may or may not be able to understand. >> eliot: switching gears quickly. the republican party and tea party got thumped. is there a lesson. there in the house, do you see colleagues i know you try to get along with everybody on a personal level but intellectually, what did they take away? >> we're seeing this during the negotiations now. i'm not sure the tea party republicans quite get the messag
evidence that some of the shoulder-fired missiles that the c.i.a. was trying to track down in libya, and f-16's may have migrated to syria bringing down a helicopter and fighter jet last week. reports that save gas has been loaded on to canisters, the united states set up a task force at a base north of jordan, in amman, that included 150 special forces working with the military of jordan to secure assad's chemical weapons. >> the world is watching. the president of the united states has made very clear there will be consequences if the assad regime makes a tell mistake by using the chemical weapons on their own people. >>reporter: the pentagon is aware a meeting of rebel groups elected a 30-member military command structure and two-thirds is made up with ties to the muslim brotherhood. >>shepard: and damascus and the airport is in the middle of a war zone. fighters declared the airport is "a legitimate target, approach at your own risk." grueling battles today on streets of the capital city. this video showing someone trying to put at the flames which engulfed the car. fox cannot confirm
of the cia. cedrick layton member of the joipt staff. what are those consequences? is the u.s. going to passing the point of no return here? >> well, it is, look, the most recent information suggests they're preparing to be able to launch these warheads containing gas and other chemical weapons. that's a problem because now, a military strike could trigger the dissemination of such weapons. what you have to do now is is get the timely tactical intelligence to interrupt the decision cycle. that is get between assad and the individual who presses the button to launch that missile. that's a very ask, very difficult, but now, that's the position we're really in. >> just to be honest, hasn't really seemed to be at least totally aware of everything happening every step of the way here. >> okay, except there was a wmd commission that looked at the failures in iraq and strengthened the committee. there are standards for assessing the credibility of sources. for how an analyst assesses a source and the information. and we know from the president's action against bin laden, he will ask the har
an intervention in syria. we'll talk to a former cia officer about that and sanjay gupta. plus an activist inside syria and what he has to say about the potential threat, next. i'm doing my own sleep study. advil pm® or tylenol pm. the advil pm® guy is spending less time lying awake with annoying aches and pains and more time asleep. advil pm®. the difference is a better night's sleep. so, the 5.3-liter v8 silverado can tow up to 9,600 pounds? 315 horsepower. what's that in reindeer-power? [ laughs ] [ pencil scratches ] [ male announcer ] chevy's giving more. get the best offer of the year -- 0% apr financing for 60 months plus $1,000 holiday bonus cash. plus trade up for an additional $1,000 trade-in allowance. hurry. bonus cash ends january 2nd. [ female announcer ] holiday cookies are a big job. everything has to be just right. perfection is in the details. ♪ get to holiday fun faster with pillsbury cookie dough. how they'll live tomorrow. for more than 116 years, ameriprise financial has worked for their clients' futures. helping millions of americans retire on their terms. when they wa
in the cia -- in this case, the culinary institute of america. >> some of these people have been in afghanistan for months or years and, you know, now they are back here in the united states and they are home and they are trying to readjust. >> reporter: everyone here is intent on being as self- sufficient as possible so they can avoid fast food and learn to cook for themselves in a healthier way. >> a lot of their injuries have prevented them from being able to work out and exercise like they used to. >> i served six years in the united states navy didn't know where to go, felt lost and wounded warrior project reached out records travis' injuries ended his naval career, but being here gives him hope. >> being in the military we have all been hurt. you know, you just become friends right away. >> reporter: they sit together for a meal that binds them in a different way. not only in the country's service, but what happens after they have come home. [ applause ] >> whoo! >> reporter: reporting from st. helena, patrick sedillo, cbs 5. >>> coming up in our next half hour, the phone
, former cia officer bob baer and dr. sanjay gupta. we talked about this last night, but explain again what one warhead filled with sarin could do. >> one of these shells and the standard shell the syrians put this in is a 122 millimeter shell, a standard artillery piece. if they were to drop this into a dense area, into damascus or a suburb of homs, it doesn't matter which town, it will instantly kill 18,000 within the first few minutes. >> from one shell? >> one single shell would immediately kill 18,000 people. you know, this is a liquid. it's dispersed. it sticks on you. you get a few -- a little bit in your system, and you're dead. >> sanjay, what does it do to somebody who comes in contact with it? >> it affects receptors in the brain, and let me preface it by saying it's odorless and tasteless and it's colorless. it's hard to even know, you know, that it's there because of those things. also by touching it as bob was talking about, but also by inhaling it or eating food or drinking water contaminated with it, you can also get poisoned. you see this is a substance that can affect you
. is it too late? national security contributor fran townsend is a member of the cia and homeland security external advisory board and colonel cedric layton is a member of the staffs. what are the consequences? is the u.s. going to passing the point of no return here? >> it is. the most recent information suggests they're actually preparing to be able to launch these warheads containing sarin gas and other chemical weapons. that's a problem, right? now a military strike could inadvertently trigger the dissemination of such weapons, what you have to do is get the intelligence to interrupt the decision cycle. get between assad and the individual who presses the button to launch that missile. that's a very big ask from the intelligence community and very difficult. that's the positive we're really in. >> the intelligence community which to be honest hasn't really seemed to be at least, you know, totally aaware of everything happening every step of the way here. >> okay, except there's been -- there was a commission that looked at the failures in iraq and strengthened the intelligence communit
. possibly for the pentagon or cia. we don't know how serious that is. so far, it's all the same circle. >> that's right. >> musical chairs. >> musical chairs. the knock a lot of people in washington give to the obama white house it is too insular and he doesn't pull the kinds of expertise he needs into this white house. there's an opportunity in this second term for him to shake things up a little bit. you know, maybe to bring in new players, new faces who have been there from the clinton white house, and kind of help the dynamic and help the governing because a lot of people on capitol hill even democrats will tell you, he's not good at governing and building coalitions. maybe if he brought some folks in who knew how to do that there would be more give and take on the fiscal cliff issue, on the tax reform and entitlement reforms that we get next year, and there is a sense he really could use a bit of some fresh blood to make things a little easier going forward. >> chris, susan, and ari, thank you very much for all joining us. and the jobs report, more jobs are added in november than
of the shoulder-fired missiles known as manpads which the cia were trying to track and contain in libya, may have migrated to syria, bringing down a syrian fighter jet and helicopter last week. then there are reports of chemical weapons, sarin gas being loaded into canisters for possible use. the u.s. set up a task force at a base north of ammon, jordan with 150 u.s. special forces working on a plan to secure assad's chemical weapons. >> the whole world is watching, the whole world is watching very closely and the president of the united states has made very clear there will be consequences, there will be consequences if the assad regime makes a terrible mistake by using these chemical weapons on their own people. >> reporter: earlier this year the pentagon estimated it would take 75,000 ground troops to secure the tons of chemical weapons in assad's possession. that is it more than the number of u.s. troops in afghanistan right now. in the meantime, the administration's public statements appear designed to at least deter the assad regime from using them. next week in an international conference
up at trials in contrast agents agents for the cia and emi six. sometimes the public sometimes wonder how they have time during the week so they can provide services. of course no one believes that. no one. not a single iranian police these people who serve the revolution have completely become counterrevolutionaries. but the idea is to instigate and get into the hearts of the rainy process, telling them that somebody like mr. massari who researches in this server, if he is not safe, he has to tear up i'm sure fire. his cabinet ministers in the 1980s have short trials, but i is a simple iranian citizen -- [inaudible] this is the change. >> thanks. emmanuelle, i want to move on to you in light of what the difference blurriness felt during her period of imprisonment from the west or from the outside world and given ali idea is a novelty in washington. what does that say about the west is doing? pup measures to the western united states are taking specifically aimed at iran on its human rights record is supposed to proliferation? >> first of all, i want to thank the panelists and the aud
in the muslim countries and leadership changes in the arab spring countries. former cia specialist is joined by the washington journal's editorial page devotee and others, the foundation for the offensive democracy hosts this event. it's just over an hour. [applause] >> good morning, everyone. thank you for that introduction and thank you, all of you for coming out early this morning for what i think will be very lively debate. we are going to be asking the question of democracy is the triumph in the middle east islamic victory is unavoidable and essentials. this is the motion that we will be debating in the intelligence square format for the requests from ruel and brian. they have had a practice round. occurred on power. the revolution in egypt has taken many turns. the muslim brotherhood has come to power through the ballot box, but that has been marred of late thanks to mohamed morsi, the president of egypt earning him the moniker on atwitter of morsilini or mubarak with a beard, and now as we look around, we are not sure where this revolution is going and nor are we aware were the of the
confessed being agents for the cia and the mossad and the mi6. even the public wonders how much time that have during the week for public services. no one believes that. not a single irony and believes that these people who served the revolution in the first decade have completely become counterrevolutionaries. the kite the it is used to instigate and put fear into the heart of the iranian public. the prime minister was chosen by the ayatollah khomeini. is he is not safe and has to appear on show trial and people were capped at ministers have to appear, and i, as a simple iranian citizen, i am totally at their mercy. this is the change which has taken place. >> thanks, ali. emanuel, want to move on to you about the indifference that marina felt during her imprisonment about the outside world and given ali's surveys and that having panels on the human rights record of iran is somewhat of a novelty in washington -- what does that say about what the west is doing? what measures are the united states taking specifically aimed at iran of its human rights record as opposed to poor for rati
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)